My Haunted Library

All things spooky. Your source for paranormal and supernatural book and movie reviews, strangeography, Halloween crafts and a little cozy fall baking.


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Review: The Library of the Unwritten

When Claire, Hell’s librarian, pursues an escaped character from an unwritten novel, she inadvertently retrieves scraps of the Devil’s Bible and sparks a conflict that spans realms and realities.

The Library of the Unwritten – A.J. Hackwith, 2019. Rating: 5/5

Hell’s Unwritten Wing houses all the books that authors never finished. It is Claire Hadley’s job to keep the volumes asleep and in good repair. Occasionally, however, they awaken and escape back to earth to find their author or to strike out on their own. With the awkward demon Leto, and her assistant, the failed muse, Brevity, Claire sets out for Seattle to retrieve a dashing escapee. They collar Hero but run afoul of Ramiel, a fallen angel. Ramiel was a Watcher: His job protecting lost human souls led to his part in the Fall. Now, the fanatical angel Uriel offers him a chance to return to his former heavenly glory if he catches Claire and retrieves the Devil’s Bible. But Claire has no taste for politics. The Library is neutral. Her devotion is solely for her written charges—some of which are her own. Claire, Hero, Leto, Brevity, and the sly demon Andras, race against Heaven to prevent a second cataclysmic war.

Bibilophiles, storytellers—everyone who appreciates a great story will love this book. Fellow librarians will rejoice. Though admittedly, we rarely reject a book about books or heroic librarians, The Library of the Unwritten stands apart and above. The premise is fresh, yet centuries of literature, mythology, and history permeate its pages. The characters shine. Each reflects our own fragilities, regrets, and longings. Their realism makes the novel’s fantastical elements wholly believable—and enviable. The Library of the Unwritten is both fantasy and philosophical adventure. It is a self-reflective story about stories, about the act of writing and creation, but it also raises questions about reality and the construction of self. What makes something real? What makes us autonomous? During her journey, Claire faces one of her own characters, forcing her to acknowledge aspects of herself. As we follow the heroes and villains (though the lines between the two are muddied) from the West Coast to Valhalla, from Heaven to Hell, we share in their journey of self-understanding and forgiveness.

I rarely give a perfect rating. The Library of the Unwritten deserves it.

rating system five crows


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Review: Kill Creek

Kill Creek – Scott Thomas, 2017.

Four wildly different horror writers, each slipping in their popularity, take a lucrative offer to get back in the spotlight: $100,000 for an intimate interview livestreamed from a famously haunted house.

Their destination: the house on Kill Creek. Site of the brutal murder of a mixed-race couple during the Civil War and more recently, the former home of two mysterious, disturbingly reclusive sisters.

Halloween night finds the authors, their interviewer, and one camerawoman alone in the ominous house.  Somewhat to their disappointment, nothing supernatural seems to happen.  No orbs, no rattling chains or wisps of ectoplasm.  But… something does happen. The real horror begins when each author returns home.

Kill Creek is a deliciously creepy tale.  Thomas revitalizes the classic haunted house theme with vividly atmospheric writing and finely-honed tension.  Small, subtle terrors give the reader satisfying shivers and ramp up the suspense.  Top things off with a nail-biting, gory finale and a quiet, sharp little dig at the end, and you’ve got wickedly good novel.

The characters as much as the house make the story great.  Sam, an author of small-town horror struggles with writer’s block.  Moore’s violent, hard-core, sex-laden books are too extreme for mainstream fans. Daniel, who makes his living on Christian teen scare novels, is losing his base.  Sebastian, king of the classic ghost story finds his writing relegated to the older generation.  The house will use each of their weaknesses.

Under all the terror, Thomas conveys a poignancy in each character’s desperate craving for relevance: In the need to balance their drive for self-expression with the desire to maintain personal space outside of their writing. Deep down, Kill Creek is also a story about the bittersweet nature of the creative act of writing.  But mostly, it’s a treat of a horror story. Nicely done, Mr. Thomas.

rating system four crowskill creek.jpg